Being There: In Bella Buenos Aires


“I suppose the closest equivalent would be ‘slow travel’, but I took it one step further, opting for the more drastic term, ‘migration travel’ for the long stay I planned”


Idler 75

November/December 2020

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The Great Outdoors: An Artist’s Impression


Courtesy of the Historic Environment Scotland Archive (HES).

Tour Scotland in the footsteps of one of Britain’s most celebrated artists, JMW Turner.

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Explore the unbridled beauty of the Scottish landscape through the masterpieces of JMW Turner, as we retrace the sites from his many tours across the spectacular country.

JMW Turner is one of Britain’s most celebrated artists and an icon of nineteenth-century Romanticism. Taking inspiration from the natural world to capture the sublime, the picturesque, and the pastoral, Turner sought out sites of untamed wilderness where natural drama converged with awe-inspiring topography. For such an undertaking, Scotland was his perfect muse, and he Scotland’s most-suited illustrator: Turner’s characteristic loose, swirling brushwork and his atmospheric use of light and colour captured perfectly Nature’s ungovernable hold over the Scottish landscape.

Turner visited Scotland six times between 1797 and 1834. And you are invited to ramble down these very same paths of discovery, along which you’ll pass ruined abbeys, possessed waters, beguiling caves, and man-made wonders. Some sites you can venture into; others you must appreciate from Turner’s distanced viewpoint. Wherever you go, you’ll be drawn into a new imagining of Scotland: an artist’s impression.


Want to know more about Turner’s tours of Scotland?


Here’s a list of the locations included:


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The Forgotten Cave of St. George: Jounieh’s Hidden Gem

It is said that the Bay of Saint George in Beirut is so named for playing host to the legendary battle of Saint George and the dragon. But not too far from this site stands a cave in the Bay of Jounieh that tells a similar story.

Lebanon Traveler
Courtesy of Peter Ghanime

This story actually begins thousands of years ago on the banks of the Ibrahim River, dividing the kazas of Byblos and Kesserwan. Much like the meanders of the Ibrahim, Kesserwan’s associations with Phoenician Mythology permeate the surrounding landscape; one name emerging eponymous with the region – Adonis.

This story actually begins thousands of years ago on the banks of the Ibrahim River, dividing the kazas of Byblos and Kesserwan. Much like the meanders of the Ibrahim, Kesserwan’s associations with Phoenician Mythology permeate the surrounding landscape; one name emerging eponymous with the region – Adonis.

According to legend, the Canaanite god of vegetation, beauty and desire is said to have been killed on the riverbank by a boar sent by Ares (in some versions, Ares himself is the boar in disguise). Adonis’s blood streamed into the river, staining it a violent shade of crimson: the color of which the river has turned every spring since.

So great was the spiritual significance of the Ibrahim River that the entire region of Keserwan was ordained with a sacred significance, giving rise to the erection of shrines and temples in Adonis’s honor. And to this day, locals go to the ruined temple at the river’s source and hang the clothes of the sick in the hope of yielding cures.

But while the story of the Ibrahim River has not faded from the country’s collective memory, there is another site divined from the same wellsprings of mythological significance, a site that is now largely forgotten. Sequestered in the Bay of Jounieh and eclipsed by the surrounding military beach lies the cave of Saint George, also known as Mar Geryes Al Bati in Arabic.

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