The Great Outdoors: An Artist’s Impression


Courtesy of the Historic Environment Scotland Archive (HES).

Tour Scotland in the footsteps of one of Britain’s most celebrated artists, JMW Turner.

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Explore the unbridled beauty of the Scottish landscape through the masterpieces of JMW Turner, as we retrace the sites from his many tours across the spectacular country.

JMW Turner is one of Britain’s most celebrated artists and an icon of nineteenth-century Romanticism. Taking inspiration from the natural world to capture the sublime, the picturesque, and the pastoral, Turner sought out sites of untamed wilderness where natural drama converged with awe-inspiring topography. For such an undertaking, Scotland was his perfect muse, and he Scotland’s most-suited illustrator: Turner’s characteristic loose, swirling brushwork and his atmospheric use of light and colour captured perfectly Nature’s ungovernable hold over the Scottish landscape.

Turner visited Scotland six times between 1797 and 1834. And you are invited to ramble down these very same paths of discovery, along which you’ll pass ruined abbeys, possessed waters, beguiling caves, and man-made wonders. Some sites you can venture into; others you must appreciate from Turner’s distanced viewpoint. Wherever you go, you’ll be drawn into a new imagining of Scotland: an artist’s impression.


Want to know more about Turner’s tours of Scotland?


Here’s a list of the locations included:


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Courtesy of Loch Ness Lodge & Spa

To visit Scotland is to travel back into a world of myths and legends; to explore ruined castles, beguiling caves and unearthly creatures; to discover folklores that define a place and a people. Here are just a few of the

Scotland’s Mythological Sites

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  • The Kelpie’s Passage: Corryvreckan Whirlpool, Outer Hebrides
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  • The Shetland Selkie, Shetland Islands
  • Fingal’s Cave: Isle of Staffa, Inner Hebrides

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